Study Group for Roman Pottery

Roman Pottery Bibliography

Regions of France: page 18c

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Normandie continued:
The authors point out that particularly after the late 4th century roller-stamped Argonne ware is virtually the only good dating evidence for many sites, since dateable coins are thereafter very rare. This means that the thirty-year periods established by Hubener for his successive types can only be a rough guide, and while there have been some criticisms of the Hubener system, it remains all there is. This paper is a considerable contribution to the subject.

Journal of Roman Pottery Studies  Vol 5, 1992 page 154
1239  Simon-Hiernard, D, 'Du nouveau sur la céramique "à l'éponge"', SFECAG, Actes du Congrés de Cognac, 1991, 61-76. 
syn/---/end of 2nd-6th (mainly 4th)/usf
mrb
This paper follows on from Mme Simon-Hiernard's book on pottery in the Musée de Poitiers (JRPS 4, entry no. 1005) by re-examining and taking a broader view of the most significant pottery type highlighted in that work, marbled wares from western France. While retaining (and re-printing) the typology established by Raimbault (Gallia 31, 1973, 185-206), this study looks in detail at the distribution of Aquitanian marbled wares, showing that they are found in highest concentration in Charente-Maritime, to the west and north of Poitiers. Although one outlier is noted from Switzerland, the bulk of the wares are found to the west of Paris, from the valley of the Gironde to the south to the Severn Valley in Britain, to the north. Simon-Hiernard's map indicates almost as many findspots in Britain as in Normandy and Brittany, and a remarkably high proportion of the findspots, even those in Charente-Maritime, are either on the coast or on rivers. One cannot usually say that an individual vessel must have travelled by water or by land to reach its destination, and of course most major settlements are linked to the rest of the world by both waterways and roads, but this map does certainly suggest a predominance of water transport for marbled wares. There is not much doubt about the finds from Britain and the Channel Islands.        
   

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