Study Group for Roman Pottery

Roman Pottery Bibliography

Switzerland: page 3

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  Baudoux, J, 'Production d'amphores dans 1'Est de la Gaule', 59-69. Several East Gaulish production centres, including Rheinzabern, seem to have produced either imitations of Dr 20 amphorae, globular Dr 20-like amphorae with flat bottoms, or Gaulish-type amphorae. The Rheinzabern Dr 20 imitations are stamped with names which also appear on samian from the site
   This paper provoked a lengthy discussion on the organisation of pottery workshops in Gaul. Schallmayer, E, 'Production d'amphores en Germanie Supérieure?', 71-4. Similar types to those of the previous paper, Walldurn, on the limes.
  
Laubenheimer, F & Lequoy, M-C, 'Les amphores Gauloise 12 de Normandie. Le matériel de la nécropole de Vatteville-la Rue', 75-92. With an appendix by F Formenti. This is a substantial updating of what is known of Gauloise 12s, small reeded-rimmed amphorae from Normandie. The distribution map shows almost as many points in Britain as in northern Gaul.
   Berthault, F, 'Production d'amphores dans la région bordelaise', 93-100. With appendices by M Picon & A Desbat, by C Latouche & N Maillet, by J-C Pons and by J Dubreuilh. Flat-bottomed amphorae from the Bordeaux region; see also entry nos. 1182 & 1183. Aranegui, C & Gisbert, J-A, 'Les amphores à fond plat de la Péninsule ibérique', 101-111. Gauloise 4-like flat-bottomed amphorae from the east coast of Spain, south of Valencia. These have fairly narrow bases, like the Narbonnaise/South Gaulish versions, and unlike more northerly types.
   Laubenheimer, F, Gébara, C & Béraud, I, 'Circulation des amphores et vide sanitaire, 1'exemple de Fréjus', 119-122. A brief summary of entry no. 1220.
   Brun, J-P, Lecacheur, P &: pasqualini, M, 'Les amphores du port antique de Toulon (Telo Martius)', 123-131. With an appendix on the stamps found on Gaulish amphorae and lids at Toulon.
   Laubenheimer, F, Schwaller, M & Vidal, L, 'Nîmes, les amphores de la rue de Condé', 133-150. With an appendix on the stamps from the rue de Condé, and an appendix by F Formenti, 'Analyse de 1'enduit interne d'une amphore Richborough 527'. Includes a number of tables, pie-charts and histograms showing the percentages of different types found. Wine predominates.
   Desbat, A & Dangréaux, B, 'La distribution des amphores dans la région lyonnaise. Etude de deux sites de consommation', 151-6. Includes several histograms and graphs showing the percentages of different types found. As at Nîmes, wine predominates.
   Martin-Kilcher, S, 'Les amphores de Gaule romaine: leur présence à Augusta Rauricorum', 157-161. A brief summary of the types, their origins and contents. Baudoux, J, 'La circulation des amphores dans le Nord-Est de la France', 163-9. More quantitative comparison. Brulet, R, Laubenheimer, F & Vilvorder, F, 'Les amphores de Braives, un vicus de Gaule Belgique', 171-7. This is a similar quantitative summary, but it includes some unusual imports, possibly from Spain and/or Italy, and a Cretan Dr 43.
   Fitzpatrick, A P, 'La place des amphores dans 1'approvisionnement militaire de 1'Ecosse romaine', 179-183. See also entry no. 1223.
  : panella, C, 'Mercato di Roma e anfore galliche nella prima età imperiale', 185-206. More tables, histograms and pie-charts showing the types found in Rome.
Cipriano, M T, 'Un sistema informativo delle iscrizioni sulla ceramica romana', 221-4. A system used at Rome for computerizing amphora inscriptions.
       Carre, M-B, 'La banque de données "timbres sur amphores romaines" du Centre Camille Jullian', 225-230. A similar system being developed at the University of Provence. Picon, M, 'L'étude en laboratoire des amphores. Problèmes spécifiques', 231-6. Problems involved in elemental analyses of amphorae.
   Virtually all of these papers are relatively brief resumes of material which either has been or will be published in more detail elsewhere. Nevertheless, given that the specific and general discussions include comments by most of the best-known amphora researchers in Europe, the volume as a whole is a remarkably comprehensive summary of the general state of amphora studies as they stood in 1990.

Journal of Roman Pottery Studies  Vol 5, 1992 page 152
1228  Marty, J, 'Cults, Snakes, and Vases', Rei Cretariae Romanae Fautores, Acta, 29/30, 1991, 349-359.
exc/rel/3rd-4th
lox (snake pots)
A study of Roman period snake vases found at the Isthmian Sanctuary of Poseidon at Corinth. Two are illustrated; fragments of a third were also found. Both of the illustrated vessels strongly resemble Romano-British face pots - Cam form 288, for example - with frilled rims, a short neck and two handles, but with a snake entwined around the body rather than a face on one side. The applied notched snake decoration also has much in common with other oxidised vessels with "plastic" decoration from Colchester and Verulamium. A brief survey reveals snake-decorated vessels have been found at London, Richborough, reeded-rimmed and biconical bowls, handled jars, flagons with one and two handles (the latter described as amphorae) and lids. Two substantial kilns are also illustrated, one rectangular and the other round.

Journal of Roman Pottery Studies  Vol 5, 1992 page 154
1239  Simon-Hiernard, D, 'Du nouveau sur la céramique "à l'éponge"', SFECAG, Actes du Congrés de Cognac, 1991, 61-76.
syn/---/end of 2nd-6th (mainly 4th)/usf
mrb
This paper follows on from Mme Simon-Hiernard's book on pottery in the Musée de Poitiers (JRPS 4, entry no. 1005) by re-examining and taking a broader view of the most significant pottery type highlighted in that work, marbled wares from western France. While retaining (and re-printing) the typology established by Raimbault (Gallia 31, 1973, 185-206), this study looks in detail at the distribution of Aquitanian marbled wares, showing that they are found in highest concentration in Charente-Maritime, to the west and north of Poitiers. Although one outlier is noted from Switzerland, the bulk of the wares are found to the west of Paris, from the valley of the Gironde to the south to the Severn Valley in Britain, to the north. Simon-Hiernard's map indicates almost as many findspots in Britain as in Normandy and Brittany, and a remarkably high proportion of the findspots, even those in Charente-Maritime, are either on the coast or on rivers. One cannot usually say that an individual vessel must have travelled by water or by land to reach its destination, and of course most major settlements are linked to the rest of the world by both waterways and roads, but this map does certainly suggest a predominance of water transport for marbled wares. There is not much doubt about the finds from Britain and the Channel Islands.

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